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Pufferfish LimitedTropical
Pufferfish single
Details
Lvl req. 1
Type Tropical
Area Tropical reef
Shop / Animal
Cost Zoo bucks 499 / 499
Gain Veteran/ Pufferfish single {{{GainVeteran}}}
Gain 09.2011/ Pufferfish single Coins2 22.000
XP 2.200
Every 1 day
Breeding / Animal
Parent1 --
Parent2 --
Cost Zoo bucks 499/499
in 21 hours
Instant Zoo bucks 32/32
Reward for completing a Family
Family XP 2.200
Family Gain Zoo bucks 5
Crossbreeding / Animal
Partner1 --
Result1 --
X-Cost1 --
X-in1 --
X-Instant1 --
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Partner2 --
Result2 --
X-Cost2 --
X-in2 --
X-Instant2 --
Collections
Collections --

The Pufferfish is a part of the Tropical themed collection.

Pufferfish modal

Tetraodontidae is a family of primarily marine and estuarine fish of the Tetraodontiformes order. The family includes many familiar species, which are variously called pufferfish, puffers, balloonfish, blowfish, bubblefish, globefish, swellfish, toadfish, toadies, honey toads, sugar toads, and sea squab. They are morphologically similar to the closely related porcupinefish, which have large external spines (unlike the thinner, hidden spines of Tetraodontidae, which are only visible when the fish has puffed up). The scientific name refers to the four large teeth, fused into an upper and lower plate, which are used for crushing the shells of crustaceans and mollusks, their natural prey.

Pufferfish are generally believed to be the second–most poisonous vertebrates in the world, after the golden poison frog. Certain internal organs, such as liver, and sometimes the skin, are highly toxic to most animals when eaten; nevertheless, the meat of some species is considered a delicacy in Japan (as 河豚, pronounced as fugu), Korea (as bok), and China (as 河豚 hétún) when prepared by chefs who know which part is safe to eat and in what quantity.

The Tetraodontidae contain at least 120 species of puffers in 19 genera. They are most diverse in the tropics and relatively uncommon in the temperate zone and completely absent from cold waters. They are typically small to medium in size, although a few species can reach lengths of greater than 100 centimetres (39 in). source: wikipedia.org